"If you do little to nothing to oppose the abuse of power, you are in fact contributing to the demise of society as a whole and in particular, this nation."

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”
― Martin Luther King Jr. Click image above to Take Action

Agenda 21- Agenda 30 -“The Great Reset”

Toxic Nanoparticles Used In COVID Vaccine Cause Death

Agenda / 21 Agenda 30 – Prepare

One Year From Now, August 2022

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“U.S. foreign policy towards the Third World must be Extermination” – Henry Kissinger, 1974 pt 1

For the New World Order, a world government is just the beginning. Once in place they can engage their plan to exterminate 80% of the world's population, while enabling the "elites" to live forever with the aid of advanced technology. For the first time, crusading filmmaker ALEX JONES reveals their secret plan for humanity's extermination: Operation ENDGAME. Jones chronicles the history of the global elite's bloody rise to power and reveals how they have funded dictators and financed the bloodiest wars—creating order out of chaos to pave the way for the first true world empire. * Watch as Jones and his team track the elusive Bilderberg Group to Ottawa and Istanbul to document their secret summits, allowing you to witness global kingpins setting the world's agenda and instigating World War III. * Learn about the formation of the North America transportation control grid, which will end U.S. sovereignty forever. * Discover how the practitioners of the pseudo-science eugenics have taken control of governments worldwide as a means to carry out depopulation. * View the progress of the coming collapse of the United States and the formation of the North American Union.

Agenda 21 Explained

Main objective: Depopulation Of 95% Of The World By 2030 source

“It Is Destined To Happen This Way” [ EXPOSED BY INSIDER ]

An inventory plan to control all: land, water, all minerals, all plants, animals, all construction, all means of production, all food, all energy, all information and all human beings. This agreement, a United Nations plan, was approved in 1992 by 179 nations.

Eugenics

Qualifying which bloodline will continue. If the proportions were not mathematically correct, you were not to procreate and was deemed unfit for society
(click to enlarge)

 

Eugenics is the practice or advocacy of improving the human species by selectively mating people with specific desirable hereditary traits. It aims to reduce human suffering by “breeding out” disease, disabilities and so-called undesirable characteristics from the human population. Early supporters of eugenics believed people inherited mental illness, criminal tendencies and even poverty, and that these conditions could be bred out of the gene pool.

Historically, eugenics encouraged people of so-called healthy, superior stock to reproduce and discouraged reproduction of the mentally challenged or anyone who fell outside the social norm. Eugenics was popular in America during much of the first half of the twentieth century, yet it earned its negative association mainly from Adolf Hitler’s obsessive attempts to create a superior Aryan race.

Modern eugenics, more often called human genetic engineering, has come a long way—scientifically and ethically—and offers hope for treating many devastating genetic illnesses. Even so, it remains controversial.

The Great Reset is Here - The Impact

The re-marketed, "New World Order" (NWO) is now The Great Reset. No matter which politics you support, no matter where you live, you will feel the brunt force of this stage of Agenda 2021.Things as you know it will be upside down. What seemed reasonable will be abolished, what is bad will be adapted as normal and inscribed as law.

  • A radical attack on freedom and traditional values to usher in the The Great Reset (NWO)
  • States will lose their sovereignty and be controlled by a central government
  • The individual will also lose their sovereignty with much of the US Constitution and the UN laws obliterated
  • Vaccinations will be mandatory - and will have little to do with Covid
  • There will be multiple vaccinations on the same individual with the ultimate result to reduce the population
  • The dollars and cash will be eliminated in the way of digital money. Your personal funds can be stopped, paused, resumed or increased depending on your behavior
  • Private property will be seized by the government or auctioned off. Private property ownership will be first exposed to the harsh condition of lock-downs, increased taxes and high unemployment
  • The population will be cattled-up, removed to live in dense areas where they can be easily controlled and monitored

"In his letter last month to the president, Archbishop Viganò wrote this and it’s worth hearing:

“This Great Reset is designed to fail because those who planned it do not understand that there are still people ready to take to the streets to defend their rights, to protect their loved ones, to give a future to their children and their grandchildren.” source for quote

California Once Forcibly Sterilized People By the Thousands. Now the Victims May Get Reparations.

 

A brutal chapter in American history began in 1909 with the stroke of a doctor’s pen.

California’s eugenics law, enacted that year, allowed medical officials to order the forced sterilization of people they deemed “feebleminded” or otherwise unfit to have children. Over the next seven decades, they carried out the surgeries at an industrial scale. More than 20,000 people, many of them with disabilities or psychiatric disorders, went under the knife in a campaign so efficient Germany’s Nazis took notice.

Now, more than 40 years after the law was repealed, California is on the cusp of approving financial reparations for the few surviving victims of the country’s largest mass sterilization program.

Legislation setting aside $7.5 million for the payments was included in the quarter-trillion-dollar state budget awaiting a signature from Gov. Gavin Newsom (D). A companion bill laying out how the fund would operate is awaiting a vote in the state Senate.

If approved, the reparations would represent a breakthrough for survivors of forced sterilization and bring a measure of closure to countless others whose relatives had their reproductive organs mutilated by the state. California accounts for a third of the roughly 60,000 forced sterilizations performed nationwide when eugenics laws were on the books, the most of the 32 states where such legislation was in place.

Just two other states, North Carolina and Virginia, have passed laws compensating forced sterilization victims. California’s measure would go further, extending the payouts to women who were coerced into sterilizations while incarcerated between 2006 and 2014.

“This is really significant because, first, California led the country. It’s also interesting because it combines two groups of survivors who were subject to sterilization abuse,” said Alexandra Minna Stern, a University of Michigan professor and leading scholar on the U.S. eugenics movement.

While monetary compensation can’t reverse the injustices the victims endured, Stern said, “it’s important. It’s a form of recognizing the harm that was done to people and a way of the state paying them back for that harm.”

The legislation fits in with a broader movement unfolding nationwide calling on officials to acknowledge historical injustices against marginalized groups and, in some cases, provide financial redress. Support for paying reparations to the descendants of enslaved people has grown in Congress, with lawmakers recently greenlighting a commission to study the issue for the first time. In March, the Chicago suburb of Evanston passed the nation’s first reparations program for African Americans.

Efforts to compensate forced sterilization victims in California have been in the works for years, but never have come this close to the finish line, advocates say. Budget squabbles in the state House prevented earlier bills from moving forward. It also took repeated sit-downs with lawmakers to convince some that the legislature needed to take action.

“We had to do a lot of education of legislators,” said Ena S. Valladares, a director at the advocacy group California Latinas for Reproductive Justice, a nonprofit that has been a leader in pushing for reparations.

The assembly passed the bill unanimously earlier this year. Newsom declined to comment on the legislation this week.

Of the $7.5 million earmarked for the program, more than $4 million would go toward the actual payouts, with each survivor receiving about $25,000. Another $2 million would cover outreach and implementation costs, while $1 million would pay for plaques and markers honoring the victims.

The bill’s lead sponsor, Assemblywoman Wendy Carrillo, said she was confident the bill would win final approval before the end of the legislative session.

“Unfortunately, California led the way and now it’s reversing course,” said Carrillo, a Democrat from Los Angeles. “There is something tangible about receiving something — saying, ‘This was wrong and this never should have happened.’ It’s one small piece of dignity that the state can provide.”

California was among the first states to begin forcibly sterilizing people in the early 1900s, joined by Indiana and Washington. More than two dozen others passed similar laws in the years that followed. At the time, many state medical experts favored the procedures as a way to improve society by preventing people they viewed as undesirable from having children. California health officials claimed the surgeries had a therapeutic value and would lead to fewer “defective” residents that needed state care.

Many victims were poor, had disabilities or suffered from untreated psychiatric disorders — traits that led officials to deem them unworthy of reproducing. A disproportionate number were people of color. Some had been imprisoned for petty crimes, while others were simply social outcasts. They ranged in age, with some as young as 13.

Sterilizations were often performed at state institutions, where medical superintendents wielded outsized power to order the procedures for a range of reasons. Little state oversight existed. Sometimes the superintendent’s sole judgment was sufficient before permanently altering patients’ bodies, according to research by Stern, who directs a research team that has spent years studying the issue.

Men almost always received vasectomies. Women were typically subjected to tubal ligation, the cutting or tying of the fallopian tubes to prevent sperm from reaching an egg. In the early years of California’s program, men made up the majority of patients, but operations on women were more frequent by the 1930s, Stern said. By mid-century, nearly all patients were women.

Sterilizations fell sharply in the early 1950s, according to Stern. The nascent disability rights movement began to push back against institutionalization and pressure psychiatric hospitals to focus on different types of care.

But a series of amendments helped keep the California’s sterilization law on the books until 1979, even as similar legislation in other states was overturned in court for violating people’s constitutional rights.

“In California, officials wanted to be careful not to bring undue legal scrutiny to the law,” Stern said.

It wasn’t until 2003 that the state formally apologized for the campaign. “Our hearts are heavy for the pain caused by eugenics,” then-Gov. Gray Davis said. “It was a sad and regrettable chapter, one that must never be repeated.”

But the specter of forced sterilizations returned just a few years later. Reporting by the Center for Investigative Reporting found that California prison officials had sterilized 144 inmates between 2006 and 2010, pressuring them into the surgeries and failing to get proper consent.

state audit later concluded that at least 39 of the sterilizations in that period were performed unlawfully. In the majority of those cases, the audit said, physicians failed to sign the inmate’s consent form saying the inmate was mentally competent and understood the long-term effects.

It could be relatively easy to find and notify those inmates if the reparations package passes. But tracking down survivors of the state’s historical sterilization program could be a challenge. Even the youngest are seniors, and some may not even know they underwent the procedures. Advocates estimate fewer than 400 are still alive, down from about 800 just a few years ago. They say they expect about 150 of them to come forward.

“Often these were people who were marginalized to begin with. We’re also talking about an aging population, many of whom would be in their 70s, 80s or 90s today,” Stern said. “There needs to be an immediate campaign to get the word out.”

Beyond that, Stern said, it’s important to preserve the memory so it doesn’t happen again.